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Why Yvonne is right to show Ronan the door

Thank goodness one woman has the backbone to draw a line in the sand. Yvonne Keating has kicked Roamin' Ronan out of the family home and she’s making it painfully clear that she’s taking his betrayal personally.

Days after the couple announced their break-up, Yvonne pointedly popped up at their under-construction new home without her wedding ring. Though devastated, she’s not going to play the confused poppet until all the nastiness somehow goes away.

A woman in the public eye showing her anger and not going into the now de rigeur pose of doe-eyed incomprehension and little-girl-lost sorrow at the rum ways of her man — a heartening change, is it not?

After all, these days you'd think it only natural that it’s the role of a man to behave like a scuzzbag and the role of a woman to — ultimately — forgive him because, well, men can't help themselves, can they? The loveable scamps ...

Toni Terry, after some pathetic ‘chase me, chase me' play acting is safely ensconced back in John's arms. Tess Daly forgives sexting hubby Vernon Kaye. The Cheryl and Ashley ‘will they, won't they' split drags on like a soap everybody stopped watching yonks ago. Even ‘wild, unpredictable' Amy Winehouse trails after ex-hubby Blake like a woman addicted to bad times.

The message is always the same. Financially, emotional, psychologically, the man has the upper hand. Perhaps it’s a reaction to that dreaded feminism, but many women today seem to believe being a ‘real woman' means developing the character traits of a doormat.

Maybe it’s because Yvonne's had a successful career, maybe she’s sharper than most or maybe women this side of the water don't take cr*p, but she seems determined not to play the role of helpless little woman’.

And if, as reports claim, she’ll make Ronan feel financial pain, good for her. After all, she put her career on hold for his sake, gave birth to and reared their three children. Her thanks? A very public humiliation, with papers gleefully pointing out that Francine Cornell, the dancer her husband had an affair with, is a ten-years-younger version of Yvonne. Nice, Ronan, nice.

Nor was this a hapless one-night fling, but a seven-month relationship so serious that Ronan thought it wise to invest in a secret mobile to send his bit-on-the-side steamy texts.

Yvonne's trauma is being played out publicly, but all infidelity (or rather, infidelity that's found out) is played out in front of an audience — if only family and friends. That why it's so humiliating for the innocent party.

Just look at the message boards over Ronan's affair. Sympathy for Yvonne certainly, but plenty of jibes, too: ‘Who knows what goes on behind closed doors' (for that, read ‘harridan’); ‘The millions she'll get will be a comfort'; ‘Phwoar, see that dancer? Can’t blame Ronan?’ It’s not that much different for ordinary people brazenly betrayed by their partners, either.

Why should Cheating Keating bring that sort of poison into his wife’s life without some sort of public response?

Who knows if the Keatings will be reconciled? But right now, Yvonne has every right to get angry. And to show it. In some ways, it’s her only defence against a malicious world. After all, to quote the old mafia saying, ‘What's right is right. Know what am I saying?'

Sometimes, even a woman's got to act like a man and refuse to take it lying down.

Belfast Telegraph