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Fast-track or backtrack? Amnesty plan is not a foregone conclusion

Jon Tonge


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Upset: Ballymurphy family members (from left) Mary Corr, Eileen McKeown, and Irene Connolly make a statement after the Government announced it will introduce a statute of limitations, bringing an end to prosecutions relating to the Troubles. Credit: Charles McQuillan

Upset: Ballymurphy family members (from left) Mary Corr, Eileen McKeown, and Irene Connolly make a statement after the Government announced it will introduce a statute of limitations, bringing an end to prosecutions relating to the Troubles. Credit: Charles McQuillan

Upset: Ballymurphy family members (from left) Mary Corr, Eileen McKeown, and Irene Connolly make a statement after the Government announced it will introduce a statute of limitations, bringing an end to prosecutions relating to the Troubles. Credit: Charles McQuillan

Conservative MP Mark Francois might not be described as the sharpest tool in the Westminster parliamentary box. Among the Honourable Gentleman’s contributions to enlightened debate have been that his military service meant he “wasn’t trained to lose” (Francois served in the Territorial Army) and informing us that, like his D-Day veteran father, he will “never submit to bullying by any German”.

Yet, amid the unsurprising fury over the announcement by his party colleague, Brandon Lewis, of a statute of limitations on Troubles investigations, Francois asked an interesting question which further discomfited his party colleague. He wanted to know exactly when legislation would arrive.


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