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Malachi O'Doherty

Education should be like NHS and target the greatest need

Malachi O'Doherty


We require a non-selective system that prioritises literacy

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'With all the concern about how to manage the academic selection tests, I was inclined to join the voices on Twitter that said, in effect, I failed, but I'm okay now.'

'With all the concern about how to manage the academic selection tests, I was inclined to join the voices on Twitter that said, in effect, I failed, but I'm okay now.'

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'With all the concern about how to manage the academic selection tests, I was inclined to join the voices on Twitter that said, in effect, I failed, but I'm okay now.'

With all the concern about how to manage the academic selection tests, I was inclined to join the voices on Twitter that said, in effect, I failed, but I'm okay now. Because I was entered into the 11-Plus in 1962. The markers determined that I hadn't done well enough and I was sent to a Christian Brothers' secondary school.

There I was taught woodwork and metalwork alongside Latin and Irish, among other subjects. The thinking seemed to be that I might yet turn out to be a joiner, or a priest. They were at least keeping their options open.

After that, they directed me more towards mainstream academic subjects, English and English literature, maths, additional maths and Irish. There was a token effort to teach me art and music and to make me fit in the gym, but there was nothing like the same concentration on these. I suspect the school thought I would probably be a civil servant.


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