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Malachi O'Doherty

Like loyalists in NI, US militias are pawns in a bigger game

Malachi O'Doherty


Rev Ian Paisley manipulated extremists... just as Trump does

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A protester screams "freedom" inside the Senate chamber after the U.S. Capitol was breached by a mob during a joint session of Congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

A protester screams "freedom" inside the Senate chamber after the U.S. Capitol was breached by a mob during a joint session of Congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Getty Images

A protester screams "freedom" inside the Senate chamber after the U.S. Capitol was breached by a mob during a joint session of Congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

It wouldn't do any harm for some of our loyalists with memories of the early period of the Troubles to go and talk to the militias which are preparing for war in the US.

The two movements have a lot in common, not least the grandiose sense of themselves that seems common to all paramilitary organisations. Paramilitaries on both sides in Northern Ireland believed that the rightness of their cause was pre-established. It did not rest on the political mood of the times.

Only with such conviction could any movement believe that it could recruit from the streets and build an army that could take on a modern state.


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