| 6.1°C Belfast

Close

Premium


Mary Kenny

Laws governing age of consent must be taught to avoid tragic outcomes

Mary Kenny


Close

Ordeal: Virginia Roberts Giuffre holds a photo of herself at age 16, when she says Jeffrey Epstein began abusing her sexually. Credit: Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Ordeal: Virginia Roberts Giuffre holds a photo of herself at age 16, when she says Jeffrey Epstein began abusing her sexually. Credit: Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Ordeal: Virginia Roberts Giuffre holds a photo of herself at age 16, when she says Jeffrey Epstein began abusing her sexually. Credit: Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

The trial — and conviction — of Ghislaine Maxwell produced one useful outcome: it shone the light on the scandal of young girls, some under the age of consent, being sexually exploited.

It’s welcome news that the topic of “consent” in sex education is to be introduced in RSE (Relationship Sexuality Education) in Ireland from next year. But not only should consent be taught: so, too, should the law about the age of consent. Too commonly, the law stipulating that it’s illegal to have sexual relations with a minor — in Ireland, aged 17; in the UK 16; in New York, 17; in Florida, 18 — has been slackly interpreted.


Top Videos



Privacy