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Nelson McCausland

You cannot hope to understand Northern Ireland without having an appreciation of Ulster-Scots

Nelson McCausland


Twenty-five years after creation of the Ulster Scots Heritage Council it is time to take stock

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The Ulster-Scots Agency has helped spread the language and culture

The Ulster-Scots Agency has helped spread the language and culture

The Ulster-Scots Agency has helped spread the language and culture

Twenty-five years ago this month, in June 1995, there was an event in Belfast City Hall to launch the Ulster-Scots Heritage Council. It was the culmination of a series of meetings that had taken place over the previous winter, with representatives from a number of organisations, as well as other interested individuals.

The meetings were convened on the initiative of the Ulster-Scots Language Society and there were folk from the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association (Northern Ireland Branch), the Northern Ireland Piping and Drumming School, the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society, the Presbyterian Historical Society and Burns Clubs, as well as the Ulster-Scots Language Society and Ulster-Scots Academy.

The Ulster-Scots Language Society had been formed in 1992 and the formation of the Ulster-Scots Heritage Council in 1995 was another significant landmark. It preceded the Belfast Agreement and the creation of a cross-border language body and is now known as the Ulster-Scots Community Network.