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Malachi O'Doherty

If I can be Irish in London or Sydney I can be Irish in Belfast... my Dublin passport now has advantages a British one doesn't

Malachi O'Doherty



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There could be a spike in immigration before a tightening of the free movement rules post-Brexit, the Home Affairs Committee has warned

There could be a spike in immigration before a tightening of the free movement rules post-Brexit, the Home Affairs Committee has warned

There could be a spike in immigration before a tightening of the free movement rules post-Brexit, the Home Affairs Committee has warned

I am trying to remember a time when there was, like now, a material advantage to being Irish. To be Irish is to be part of a community of nations bonded in mutual co-operation. To be British, on the other hand, is to be part of a plucky little country which is finding its way in the world and facing the imminent threat of partition.

I grew up with an understanding that being Irish was a spiritual asset, but a drawback in other respects. One could be proud of having been born into the true faith in the land of saints and scholars. That sounds ridiculous now, but my teachers expected pupils to absorb and believe it.

There were both drawbacks and advantages of living in the north. The health and welfare systems were better. My mother was paid a family allowance for me and, though we sniffed at it, the state offered free education.


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