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Just don't eat apples if you're around me

Claire Williamson


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'The worst sound is apples being eaten. I can hear nothing else when that starts.'

'The worst sound is apples being eaten. I can hear nothing else when that starts.'

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'The worst sound is apples being eaten. I can hear nothing else when that starts.'

Sometimes all it takes is the sound of the lid coming off a Tupperware box.

The ordinary act of someone about to eat something fills me with dread for the imminent assault on my ears.

I definitely relate to the 51% of people in Specsavers' survey on sound who cannot enjoy themselves when they hear a noise they find irritating.

I cannot stay around it. I have to either remove myself or drown it out with headphones.

I've found over the years, no matter what way you address it, people either go the opposite way to wind you up more, or eat really slowly to prevent noise, which makes it last longer.

Contrary to Specsavers' findings, I would take a car alarm any day over the relentless chewing, slurping and crunching of people eating.

The worst sound is apples being eaten. I can hear nothing else when that starts.

The problem is mostly sounds in isolated areas - in the office if people are eating at their desk around you, in the cinema etc. I would ban food in those places.

Other offenders include the shrill sound of cutlery on a plate and the endless scraping of a yoghurt pot as people eke out the remnants of a snack.

I am not alone in this. A relatively new term in the psychology world is misophonia.

While some people may experience a passing annoyance at certain sounds, for people with misophonia, the sound of someone slurping their tea is unbearable.

Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of sounds I do like. But my favourite is silence.

Belfast Telegraph