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Unionism has to stop believing it can get to a new place by staying in an old place

Graham Spencer and Rev Chris Hudson


Ulster says no is not the way forward and only by embracing others can the Union be safeguarded

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Ulster says no: A huge loyalist protest against the Anglo-Irish Agreement at Belfast City Hall in 1985

Ulster says no: A huge loyalist protest against the Anglo-Irish Agreement at Belfast City Hall in 1985

Ulster says no: A huge loyalist protest against the Anglo-Irish Agreement at Belfast City Hall in 1985

Is political unionism a finished product or a work in progress? If it’s a finished product what did it end up creating and if it’s a work in progress what does it aspire to create? Objections to the NI Protocol provide unionism with a meaning that it is used to: the politics of rejection and resistance. And the inability of unionism to provide a compelling and inclusive political alternative to the enduring picture of loss and decay continues to provide solace only for those who value protesting against something.

However, this reactive mentality reveals not just an absence of imagination but an absence of hope.


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