Belfast Telegraph

Kate Carroll: Steve's human rights went to the grave with him

Stephen Carroll
Stephen Carroll

By Kate Carroll

I was in complete shock after reading an article about a convicted man who was involved in the murder of my husband Stephen Carroll on March 9 2009.

It's the irony and temerity of the fact that a man convicted in a Court of Law for murder would choose to study criminology and psychology. It's none of my business but I thought it strange.

In as much as I admire and respect people who make good choices in life to further and advance their education, it leaves me wondering about the true motives behind this choice of career.

Hopefully he will use his degree to bring about change in our country by doing extensive research on the factors both psychologically and socially that lead to the causes of heinous crimes being committed.

My husband studied for a degree in Sports Science which he slotted into his life including being a father, grandfather and husband. He also carried out his work protecting the community where his life was tragically taken away.

He, (through no fault of his own) never got the chance to realise his dream of working with people who had suffered from heart attacks and strokes.

His human rights went to the grave with him.

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Steve was denied the right to life by a person who is now demanding the right to internet access - what an insult to every sane person and logically thinking person on this Island.

There is no contest between life versus internet access!

Why are convicted criminals allowed to have internet and media services access?

Stephen and Kate Carroll
Stephen and Kate Carroll

How was Mr McConville able to have air-time on a radio station whilst still incarcerated?

It would have made more sense to have spoken out in the court and protested innocence there.

Instead he came into court in grubby clothes wearing a long beard and refused to recognise the court.

I wouldn't have said those were the actions of an innocent person.

Do criminals have more rights than their victims?

Why are they able to have interaction with the judicial system at all?

Taxpayers' money would be put to better use investigating how convicted felons are able to access outside services for their own personal gain.

A criminologist's job is to determine and analyse why a crime was committed and find ways to prevent further criminal behaviours.

Hopefully Mr McConville will use his knowledge of criminology in this way and not as a possible tool to find loopholes in the judicial system.

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