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Statistics fluctuate but one constant is that orange and green don't agree on NI's future

Jon Tonge


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'Whilst a reduction in those declaring as 'neither' might be seen as potentially derailing the Alliance bandwagon, it is worth noting that 40% of the general election vote for Naomi Long's party came from voters who do see themselves as either unionist or nationalist'

'Whilst a reduction in those declaring as 'neither' might be seen as potentially derailing the Alliance bandwagon, it is worth noting that 40% of the general election vote for Naomi Long's party came from voters who do see themselves as either unionist or nationalist'

�INPHO/Lorcan Doherty

'Whilst a reduction in those declaring as 'neither' might be seen as potentially derailing the Alliance bandwagon, it is worth noting that 40% of the general election vote for Naomi Long's party came from voters who do see themselves as either unionist or nationalist'

The latest instalment of the annual QUB/UU ARK Life and Times survey is an intriguing snapshot of the state of play in Northern Ireland.

Given the anger among some over Brexit, it is not surprising to find that the proportion of nationalists identifying as such 'very strongly' is the highest since the Good Friday Agreement.

The percentage of Catholics identifying as nationalist has also risen. And those nationalists are rather like children in December - excited that Father Christmas, or in this case, Irish unity, is coming soon.