| 3.4°C Belfast

Boxing fans will be the only losers when Fury meets Joshua

Close

Tyson Fury, of England, celebrates after defeating Deontay Wilder during a WBC heavyweight championship boxing match Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

Tyson Fury, of England, celebrates after defeating Deontay Wilder during a WBC heavyweight championship boxing match Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

AP

Tyson Fury, of England, celebrates after defeating Deontay Wilder during a WBC heavyweight championship boxing match Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)

Frank Warren wasn't slow when it came to unleashing the hyperbole.

A world heavyweight title unification fight between Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua would be "the biggest British sporting event since the 1966 World Cup final," he told us.

Frank was obviously asleep throughout the 2012 London Olympics but you could forgive the promoter's excitement after his boy - who is arguably more Irish than British, but that's an argument for another day - beat the bejesus out of Deontay Wilder.

And boxing fans on these islands are beside themselves too; Fury v AJ, eh? And it's bound to be at Wembley or one of the other huge stadiums we're blessed with. Surely Boris will insist on it being on terrestrial TV too... and not in the middle of the night?

Er, no. We're deluding ourselves, thinking that what the fans desire will have any bearing on what the myriad of promoters eventually come up with.

First of all, Wilder, when he recovers from the savage beating inflicted on him on Saturday night, has a contractual right to demand a third meeting with The Gypsy King. Rather inconvenient, that.

Secondly, those well-heeled gentlemen from Saudi Arabia who bankrolled Joshua's rematch with Andy Ruiz Jr are more than keen to bring another heavyweight blockbuster to the Middle East.

Thirdly, with Fury proving to be such a huge hit - in more ways than one - in Vegas, there will be intense pressure on his management not to swap the Nevada sand for the Riyadh dunes.

Finally, no matter where the fight is held, "paying customers" will fork out a hefty subscription fee to see it. The only thing the promoters are really thrashing out is how much.

It was Chris Eubank who described boxing as a merciless business. And that's before you make it into the ring.

Belfast Telegraph