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A look at England’s previous record in major tournament semi-finals

England reached the semi-finals in the first edition of the Cricket World Cup but were defeated by Australia.

Mark Wood, right, celebrates taking the wicket of New Zealand’s Mitchell Santner (Owen Humphreys/PA)
Mark Wood, right, celebrates taking the wicket of New Zealand’s Mitchell Santner (Owen Humphreys/PA)

England take on Australia in the World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston on Thursday.

Victory over New Zealand in their final group match secured Eoin Morgan’s men a spot in their first World Cup semi-final since 1992.

Here, PA looks at England’s record of reaching the knockout stages of major tournaments.

Cricket World Cup 1975 – semi-final v Australia, Headingley, Leeds

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Gary Gilmour, bottom left, took six for 14 against England (PA Images)

England reached the semi-finals in the first edition of the Cricket World Cup but were defeated by Australia. In what is still the best World Cup performance to date by a bowler, Gary Gilmour took six for 14 with England bowled out for 93 after having fallen to 37 for seven. Australia also fell to 39 for six before Gilmour hit 28 runs from 28 balls to seal a four-wicket victory.

Cricket World Cup 1979 – semi-final v New Zealand, Old Trafford, Manchester

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Lined up at Lord’s, the eight finalists in the 1979 World Cup (PA Images)

New Zealand elected to bowl after winning the toss and England quickly fell to 38 for two. However, 53 from Mike Brearley and 71 from Graham Gooch lifted England’s innings with the final score reaching 221. New Zealand’s John Wright hit 69 but the loss of wickets hampered their efforts. After failing to hit the required 14 runs in the final over, England went on to play the West Indies in the final but lost by 92 runs.

Cricket World Cup 1983 – semi-final v India, Old Trafford, Manchester

England won the toss and elected to bat but restrictive Indian bowling led them to be bowled out for 213. In response, India’s Yashpal Sharma and Sandeep Patil made half-centuries as they reached their target in 54.4 overs, winning by six wickets and subjecting England to another semi-final defeat.

ICC Champions Trophy 2004 – semi-final v Australia, Edgbaston, Birmingham

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Paul Collingwood and Andrew Strauss, left, celebrate their last-four victory in 2004 (John Giles/PA)

England faced Australia in their first Champions Trophy semi-final and elected to bowl. Darren Gough took three for 48 as Australia reached 259 for nine. England’s Michael Vaughan hit 86 in reply as the target was reached after 46.3 overs with England notching 262 for four. The West Indies awaited in the final but England went on to lose by two wickets.

ICC Champions Trophy 2009 – semi-final v Australia, SuperSport Park, Centurion, South Africa

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Eoin Morgan was dismissed by Australia’s Shane Watson during the 2009 semi-final (Gareth Copley/PA)

After defeat in the 2004 semi-final, Australia claimed revenge over their rivals. Tim Bresnan hit an impressive 80 but England were all out for 257. The Aussies made their victory look easy, losing only one wicket as they reached their target with Shane Watson hitting 136 not out. Australia went on to beat New Zealand by six wickets in the final.

ICC World Twenty20 2010 – semi-final v Sri Lanka, Beausejour Stadium, Gros Islet, St Lucia

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Stuart Broad, second left, took two for 21 (Rebecca Naden/PA)

The third edition of the World Twenty20 tournament took place 10 months after the second due to the cancellation of the Champions Trophy in 2008. Sri Lanka were all out for 128 as Stuart Broad took two for 21. After a score of 42 from Kevin Pietersen, England reached their target in 16 overs leaving them to face Australia in the final. After another fine Pietersen performance, linking up for an 111-run partnership with Paul Collingwood, England claimed their first International Cricket Council world championship.

ICC Champions Trophy 2013 – semi-final v South Africa, The Oval, London

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Jonathan Trott’s 82 was the top score in England’s victory (Anthony Devlin/PA)

England elected to bowl after winning the toss and James Tredwell took an impressive three for 19 in seven overs as South Africa were bowled out for 175. Jonathan Trott’s 82 was the top score for England as they reached their target – losing only three wickets in the process. They went on to face India in the final at Edgbaston but narrowly lost by five runs.

ICC World Twenty20 2016 – semi-final v New Zealand, Feroz Shah Kolta, Delhi

England won the toss and elected to bowl with New Zealand reaching 153 for eight from their 20 overs. England replied as Jason Roy scored the second-fastest half-century for an English player in a World Twenty20 match as he reached the landmark off 26 balls. The target was met after 17.1 overs as England progressed to the final where they were narrowly beaten by the West Indies.

ICC Champions Trophy 2017 – semi-final v Pakistan, Sophia Gardens, Cardiff

After qualifying for the semi-finals by winning their first two group games, England faced Pakistan in Cardiff. Joe Root hit 46 as Hasan Ali took three for 35 with England reaching 211 before they were bowled out. Pakistan lost only two wickets as they reached their target in 37.1 overs after Azhar Ali finished with 76. They went on to beat rivals India by 180 runs in the final.

PA

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