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Rangers vow to eradicate sectarian abuse after Steve Clarke's 'Dark Ages' Ibrox slam

Corner flag ahead of the William Hill Scottish Cup fifth round replay match at Ibrox Stadium, Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday February 20, 2019. See PA story SOCCER Rangers. Photo credit should read: Jane Barlow/PA Wire. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Corner flag ahead of the William Hill Scottish Cup fifth round replay match at Ibrox Stadium, Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday February 20, 2019. See PA story SOCCER Rangers. Photo credit should read: Jane Barlow/PA Wire. EDITORIAL USE ONLY

Rangers say 'everything possible' will be done to stamp out sectarian abuse at Ibrox.

Following Wednesday evening's 5-0 Scottish Cup replay victory over Kilmarnock, visitng boss Steve Clarke hit out, accusing the Rangers support of living in the Dark Ages.

Chants of "sad Fenian b*****d" echoed around Ibrox as the home side booked a quarter-final clash with Aberdeen.

However, the club says that it "wishes to make it clear that unacceptable behaviour will not be tolerated at Ibrox".

The statement added: "Everything possible will be done to eradicate this kind of behaviour."

Kilmarnock FC has released a statement to confirm that the board, along with "everyone at the club is fully behind Steve in condemning sectarianism in all its forms".

"There is no place for sectarianism in football or society," it continued. "We are an inclusive family club, who celebrate the diversity of our staff, players and supporters."

The game at Ibrox followed just three days after Kilmarnock striker Kris Boyd said he was the subject of sectarian abuse when he was struck by a coin as Celtic visited Killie's Rugby Park.

He said: "Oh, and in case anyone didn't know, I'm just a fat ORANGE (it must just be my favourite colour) b******. The shouts and abuse I can handle as a bit of banter even though if others it would be sectarianism. Getting hit with a coin, though, is a step too far. I wasn't injured but if it doesn't stop someone will end up with a bad injury. Thought those days in (British) football were over."

Killie director Cathy Jamieson had earlier tweeted to call for an end to sectarian abuse in the sport.

"No place in football for sectarianism," she said. "Not good enough that @KilmarnockFC manager Steve Clarke and club captain Kris Boyd targeted for abuse in recent matches. Time to end this nonsense once and for all".

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