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'I feel a responsibility to tell all their stories': GAA begin to mark centenary of Bloody Sunday when 14 civilians died at match


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Central figure: Julianne McKeigue with a portrait of Michael Hogan

Central figure: Julianne McKeigue with a portrait of Michael Hogan

SPORTSFILE

Joanne Clarke

Joanne Clarke

Central figure: Julianne McKeigue with a portrait of Michael Hogan

Almost a century on from the darkest ever day of GAA history, the Association has begun a series of events to mark Bloody Sunday, when 14 civilians were killed or fatally wounded at a football challenge match between Dublin and Tipperary.

The incident at Croke Park took place on November 21, 1920 when Crown forces intended to raid the crowd following a series of assassinations of British intelligence agents that morning by the IRA, directed by Michael Collins' squad.

However, panic broke out in the crowd as firing started and by the end of the shooting, 14 people were either dead or would die in the coming days.


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