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Ulster Scots handy guide for visitors to The Open at Portrush

While there may be some choice language at The Open at Portrush, the Ulster-Scots Agency has issued a helpful list of 50 Ulster-Scots words that visitors to the area might encounter when talking to locals.

The list includes words like crabbit, crack, danner, footery, foundered and hoke, together with their meanings in English.

Many golfing terms actually derive from the Scots language, such as "divot". 

An Ulster-Scots Agency spokesperson said: "It's fantastic that so many thousands of people are visiting Portrush and the wider north coast for The Open.

"Since the area is part of the coastal arc of Northern Ireland where the Ulster-Scots language is strongest, we thought it would be a good idea to make sure that folk could recognise and understand Ulster-Scots when they came across it.

"We have bantered GMAC a wee bit, but we are sure as a local he will take it in good part and naturally we wish him all the best for the remainder of the tournament."

Here's another great golfing word with a Scots language origin. Sadly it will be another good Ulster-Scots word,...

Posted by Ulster-Scots Agency on Friday, July 19, 2019

Ulster-Scots phrases

1. Aye - yes

Sign In

2. Birl - spin

3. Breeks - trousers

4. Canny - careful

5. Carfuffle - commotion

6. Carnaptious - irritable

7. Crabbit - grumpy

8. Crack - banter, news

9. Cribpad - footpath

10. Danner - stroll

11. Footery - awkward to work at

12. Forbye - as well

13. Foundered - feeling very cold

14. Farl - quarter round griddle scone, soda farl

15. Gulder - shout loudly

16. Happed up - wrapped up warm

17. Hallion - a rascal

18. Heartsome - comforting

19. Hoke - dig, root around

20. Houl - hold

21. Houl yer wheest - keep quiet

22. Jeuk - avoid

23. Lassie - girl

24. Mind - remember

25. Mingin - dirty and smelly

26. Neb - nose

27. Oul - old

28. Oxter - armpit

29. Poke - ice cream cone

30. Pruck - stuff

31. Quare - considerable

32. Redd up - tidy up

33. Scallion - spring onion

34. Simmet - vest

35. Scraigh o dawn - very early morning

36. Scunnered - disgusted

37. Shoogley - unsteady

38. Skelf - splinter

39. Skiff o rain - light shower

40. Slabber - loudmouth or saliva

41. Sleekit - sly

42. Steamin - very drunk

43. Stoor - dust

44. Teemin - raining hard

45. Thole - endure

46. Thon - that

47. Thonder - there

48. Thran - stubborn

49. Wean - child

50. Wee - small

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