Belfast Telegraph

Shock after French driver Hubert killed in F2 horror crash

 

Tragic loss: Anthoine Hubert
Tragic loss: Anthoine Hubert

By Ian Parkes

A dark cloud hovered over yesterday's Belgian Grand Prix after young French driver Anthoine Hubert was killed in a devastating 160mph Formula Two crash at Spa-Francorchamps on Saturday.

Hubert (22) raced for British team Arden - run by Garry Horner, the father of Red Bull boss Christian Horner - in the championship which acts as a feeder series to Formula One.

He lost control of his car on the exit of the notorious uphill Eau Rouge corner before slamming into the far-side barrier. The Frenchman flew off the tyre wall and slid across the circuit before he was hit head on by the unsuspecting American Juan-Manuel Correa.

The severity of the incident was instantly obvious. Debris littered the tarmac and the official TV feed cut away from the scene, while there were no replays of the accident.

He becomes the first driver since Ayrton Senna died at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix to be killed while driving in an FIA-accredited race during a Formula One weekend.

Jules Bianchi, another young French driver, died in July 2015, nine months on from the brain injuries he sustained after he crashed into a crane at the rain-hit race in Japan.

Correa was airlifted to Liege Hospital, 40 miles to the north west of the circuit in the Ardennes.

It is understood that the American (20) has broken his legs and was sedated at the scene. Giuliano Alesi, the son of former Ferrari driver Jean Alesi, was also involved but escaped without injury.

Mick Schumacher, at the side of his father Michael for the skiing accident which has ensured he has not been seen in public for almost six years ago, took part in Saturday's abandoned race.

The young German was seen staring vacantly in the pit lane moments before the news of Hubert's death was confirmed.

Mechanics of the Arden team were also seen consoling one another in the support-race paddock.

Belfast Telegraph

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph