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Wales fly-half Dan Biggar takes the positives from Six Nations performance

Dan Biggar believes that Wales are "in pretty good shape" at the conclusion of this season's RBS 6 Nations Championship.

While fly-half Biggar accepts that Wales' title hopes were undone by a first-half horror show against England at Twickenham, they can still reflect on a runners-up finish, while also scoring more points and tries than any other team.

"We seem to say the same thing," Biggar said.

"It was 40 minutes against England this term, and it was the same last year, after which we went on to play some good rugby and should have won the championship, albeit we had that freak of a final day in 2015.

"So other than 40 minutes of poor rugby against England at Twickenham, I think we are in pretty good shape.

"Forty minutes of poor rugby in the first half has really hurt us, and that is something we have to address.

"Moving forward, we have to be pleased with the way we responded (against Italy), but it doesn't make up for the disappointment of last week.

"After 40 minutes of poor rugby, we've still finished second.

"We are a country who like to look at the negative side of things, but let's look at the positives, and try and get some support for the team ahead of a pretty tough tour to New Zealand (in June)."

Asked about the criticism sometimes levelled at Wales during the Six Nations, Biggar added: "I am sure you guys (media) make plenty of mistakes in your day-to-day jobs, but it just doesn't get highlighted in the same way.

"That is the world we live in, and especially in Wales, where we live in a goldfish bowl and it's magnified a lot more.

"For me, I always prefer criticism because I don't like nice things being said about me because naturally you can fall back into a comfort zone and think you are the best player in the world. That's far from it. You have to take things with a pinch of salt.

"The more constructive criticism you receive from team-mates or coaches - people within the camp - is more relevant.

"It's totally understandable. If we don't play well, we will expect some flak, and that's how it should be in any form of life. I quite enjoy the criticism, because it makes us realise we have to go up another gear."

Wales will face the All Blacks in three Tests - they also return to Twickenham for another appointment with England on May 29 - having never beaten the reigning world champions in New Zealand.

The All Blacks will not have superstar performers like Richie McCaw, Dan Carter and Ma'a Nonu to call upon, yet they remain the most formidable challenge in world rugby.

"They are world champions, and they will have a lot of the players who played in the (2015) World Cup final," Biggar said.

"It's the toughest test you can imagine - three Tests back-to-back in New Zealand - but we see it as an opportunity.

"It will be the start of their season, whereas we will be going there having played a warm-up game.

"So, it's a great opportunity to pick up a result out there, and that is our aim. It would be one of the greatest achievements this team has ever produced."

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