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Jordan Sloan: I can get stronger and faster to make an even better Olympic bid next year

 

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Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

�INPHO/Bryan Keane

Jordan Sloan

We are asking our sporting personalities how they are dealing with action coming to a halt because of the coronavirus pandemic and how it has affected their daily lives.

Today, we speak to Irish 200m freestyle record holder and international swimmer Jordan Sloan.

Q: How are you keeping?

A: I'm doing alright, I'm staying as positive as possible. This whole situation puts things in perspective. I'm in a fortunate position as a full-time athlete and all my family have so far remained healthy so I'm thankful for that and all the support I've received.

Q: How have you been affected?

A: I was primed and ready to go for Olympic qualification at the Irish trials so when the word came through that it was cancelled I was obviously gutted and for a while I was pretty frustrated with the whole thing. I'm 26 and I believe at my peak so I was confident of going for the 200m freestyle time and also we had a chance of taking two relay teams to the Games. Obviously I'm not able to swim so that is tough but there are many people in a worse state.

Q: How are you keeping fit?

A: The guys at the Sports Institute of Northern Ireland provided me with a bar and weights so I am able to go out and do my strength programme in the back garden. I also do some cycling and running to keep my fitness up. Overall I'm quite happy with my fitness and the reality is that everyone is in the same boat.

Jordan Sloan

 

Q: How are you maintaining morale?

A: My results were looking good leading up to the Irish trials, the strength work I had done with Ryan Keating at SINI had really paid off. So I know the shape I was in and the way I see it with the Games another 12 months away it gives me even more time to get stronger and faster. I'll be able to focus fully on my swimming so my best chance of qualifying for the Olympics has only been delayed a year.

Q: Where are you drawing you inner strength from now?

A: I have an inner resolve. During my career I've had some setbacks and come back from them so I'm staying strong. I've got a few friends who work in the NHS so when I see what they're going through it's an inspiration and it also makes me realise that swimming is very insignificant as is all sport. When you get into a crisis like this, sport is not a priority.

Q: Sports fans are staying at home, too. Can you recommend a book, film or box set you think they might enjoy?

A: I've recently finished reading Mythos by Stephen Fry and I would recommend that. The movie I would suggest watching is The Departed and for a box-set I'd say The Tiger King on Netflix which I watched recently.

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Jordan Sloan

Jordan Sloan

�INPHO/Bryan Keane

Jordan Sloan

 

Q: What life lessons are you learning from this?

A: I've learned not to take being a full-time sportsman for granted, which I probably did in the past. I'm in a really fortunate position so I'll not being taking it in any way for granted in the future.

Q: What is the first thing you will do when this is over?

A: The first thing will be to up to the Aurora and go for a swim and I also want to go and see everyone close to me as soon as possible - including my 85-year-old granny Margaret.

Q: And your message to sports fans?

A: I would just say to be patient because everything will get back to normal and we will get to do the things that we have wanting to. Hopefully it will be too long before the lockdown starts to ease and my team Liverpool get the chance to wrap up the Premier League title!

Belfast Telegraph