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Lift for Northern Ireland swimming clubs' bid to stay afloat

 

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Northern Ireland swimming coaches and clubs are set to receive a funding boost during the coronavirus pandemic from the UK's biggest annual recreational swimming event, Swimathon

Northern Ireland swimming coaches and clubs are set to receive a funding boost during the coronavirus pandemic from the UK's biggest annual recreational swimming event, Swimathon

©INPHO/Ryan Byrne

Northern Ireland swimming coaches and clubs are set to receive a funding boost during the coronavirus pandemic from the UK's biggest annual recreational swimming event, Swimathon

Northern Ireland swimming coaches and clubs are set to receive a funding boost during the coronavirus pandemic from the UK's biggest annual recreational swimming event, Swimathon.

The event has formed a Foundation which has created a hardship fund for clubs across the UK who have been worst hit by the effects of Covid-19, with Northern Ireland clubs set to be among those to benefit.

Depending on how badly they have been affected, clubs and coaches could be given a grant between £250 and £1,000.

Clubs can apply through the Swimathon website as long as they are a registered or affiliated club or swim school with a national governing body or a small or local swimming organisation working in the community.

Swimathon president and Olympic gold medallist Duncan Goodhew MBE said: "I'm thrilled that we're able to support members of the Belfast swimming community at this difficult time.

"Almost all swimming clubs are run by a few individuals who put in an immense amount of voluntary time to keep clubs afloat. Now that hard times have hit, they may be really struggling with all of the costs associated.

"These are the unsung heroes of the sport and it's so important that we do all we can to help them get through this."

Swimathon has raised over £50m for charity since its first running in 1986, with this year's event set to take place in over 600 swimming pools across the UK between October 16-18.

Belfast Telegraph