Sunday Life

| 5°C Belfast

Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston ‘itching’ to explore his Armagh roots

Close

Bryan Cranston (Matt Crossick/PA)

Bryan Cranston (Matt Crossick/PA)

Bryan Cranston (Matt Crossick/PA)

Breaking Bad’s Bryan Cranston is planning to visit Armagh, his ancestral home.

The actor, who played Walter White in the drama and Hal in Malcolm in the Middle, said on Friday night’s Late Late Show he was “itching” to visit the area because it’s where his great-great-great-great grandparents came from.

He told presenter Ryan Tubridy: “I’ve got to come back to Ireland. I haven’t been in several years and I’ve never been to where my people come from in Armagh. I’ve got to go up there.

“I know when I watched the play The Ferryman in London, I thought ‘That’s where my people are from, so I have to go and see what that was like’. I can’t wait.

“My great-great-great-great grandparents came from Armagh, so I’m just itching to go there, soak up the energy, meet the people, be in the culture and get some sense of where my roots started.”

The actor (64), who can currently be seen in new legal drama Your Honor, also revealed how he deals with fame after the success of Breaking Bad, in which he played a meek chemistry teacher turned ruthless drug baron.

“Celebrity is a strange beast. No acting class teaches you how to be a celebrity,” he said.

“Along with celebrity comes tremendous opportunities, so I would not trade it in, but there is a learning curve to it. You lose a sense of privacy and anonymity.

“There are pomp and circumstance events that you have to attend and those are tiring, but in the long run it’s not a complaint — it’s an observation. I have great opportunity and I’m appreciative of it.”

The actor also told the show he was still suffering after contracting Covid-19 last July.

Close

Breaking Bad

Breaking Bad

Breaking Bad

He and his wife fell ill for a few days, but he has still to fully regain his sense of taste and smell.

“We were very lucky. We had very mild symptoms,” he said.

“The only lingering thing was that I lost my sense of taste and smell. Now it’s back to about 70 to 75 percent, which is still not great.”

Belfast Telegraph


Top Videos



Privacy