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How Lisnagarvey are using Ireland star's new tracing app to minimise coronavirus risk

 

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Ireland star Sean Murray developed the tracing app in use by Lisnagravey HC and Lisburn CC

Ireland star Sean Murray developed the tracing app in use by Lisnagravey HC and Lisburn CC

Ireland star Sean Murray developed the tracing app in use by Lisnagravey HC and Lisburn CC

When spectators are eventually allowed to attend hockey matches in the new season, which is due to start in September, they are likely to undergo strict vetting procedures.

They will be expected to fill in a health questionnaire to guard against the risk of spreading coronavirus and any fans who are displaying symptoms will be refused access.

The system is already in place amidst the limited hockey training activity which is proceeding and is currently restricted to high-performance athletes in the main.

Ireland's Ulster-based men took part in a socially-distanced regional session at Lisnagarvey on Wednesday when additional protocols were strictly observed.

These included adhering to a one-way system when entering and leaving the ground, a ban on spitting and touching hockey balls with anything but their sticks, along with the use of personalised water bottles and other equipment. Upon their arrival at Comber Road, players were temperature-checked after answering questions relating to symptoms of the virus on a mobile phone.

Lisnagarvey have devised a contact tracing app which negates the need for paper work and takes just 60 seconds to complete.

The brainchild of current Ireland and former Garvey star Sean Murray, who now plays on the continent, the app is also being used by Lisburn Cricket Club, a local church and a restaurant in Belfast.

Murray explained: "The person coming to the club registers on their own phone every time they visit and the Covid Officer then digitally verifies their attendance.

"Should anyone later require tracing, it is easy to search the data to find who was at the club at the designated date and time.

"It's quick and efficient, in line with government guidelines and safer than having a hard copy tracing system."

Belfast Telegraph