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Carrickfergus mum admits to holding 'UDA' drugs

New blow to loyalist gang

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Chantelle Crozier

Chantelle Crozier

Glenn Quinn

Glenn Quinn

Clifford Irons

Clifford Irons

Gary Fisher

Gary Fisher

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Chantelle Crozier

A woman arrested by anti-terror cops during an investigation into UDA drug dealing has been convicted of possessing cocaine, prescription pills and criminal property.

Chantelle Crozier will be sentenced in February after losing a contest hearing at Belfast Magistrates Court.

The 32-year-old admitted having cocaine, temazepam tablets and smuggled cigarettes during Paramilitary Crime Taskforce raids at her Carrickfergus home in September 2019. She was also found guilty of possessing criminal property.

However, the mum-of-one denied the more serious charges of drug dealing which were withdrawn by the prosecution.

Crozier was suspected of being part of a group of 'lily-white' females, with no criminal records, who the South East Antrim UDA used to move drugs around Carrickfergus.

This was to avoid attention from cops who have cracked down hard on the terror gang since its sickening murder of terminally-ill Glenn Quinn, who was beaten to death in the Co Antrim town a year ago.

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Glenn Quinn

Glenn Quinn

Glenn Quinn

Loyalist sources say the female drug transport network was shut down after details of it were revealed in this newspaper last April following Crozier's first court appearance.

"The drugs and cigarettes Chantelle had in her possession belonged to the UDA," explained an insider.

"At the time it had a group of women who would move cocaine and cannabis around Carrick, but that was stopped after Chantelle was in the papers. They knew the cops were onto them."

Continuous pressure from the Paramilitary Crime Taskforce has backed the South East Antrim UDA's leadership into a corner, with its leaders fearing having assets seized and living like recluses as a result.

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Clifford Irons

Clifford Irons

Clifford Irons

Its veteran 'brigadier' Gary Fisher, once a fitness fanatic who would go on 50-mile cycles, now rarely leaves his home in the coastal town of Greenisland.

The UDA's Carrickfergus boss Clifford 'Trigger' Irons - a self-confessed cocaine user - has aged terribly having been forced to hand over his home to the National Crime Agency, and witness his wife Tanya convicted of benefit fraud.

Meanwhile, the once-feared UDA boss in the Rathcoole estate - which is the gang's powerbase - is living the life of a hermit after developing a serious cocaine addiction.

"The three of them are under real pressure, the Taskforce really has them rattled," said our source.

"Fisher is convinced he will be hit with an Unexplained Wealth Order when they become law here, that's why he moved from his house in Rathcoole to Greenisland.

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Gary Fisher

Gary Fisher

Gary Fisher

"Y (name withheld for legal reasons) is supposed to be in charge of the Rathcoole UDA, but the only thing on his mind is where he is getting his next line of coke.

"He was seen out at the shop last week, which isn't like him because he sits at home all day taking drugs. People couldn't believe how gaunt he was, he looked terrible," added our UDA source.

"The same goes for Trigger whose hair has fallen out with all the worry of losing his house and the wife being convicted of benefit fraud."

The South East Antrim UDA, which has approximately 2,000 members, is considered by police to be the biggest criminal gang in Northern Ireland. Led by Fisher, it controls drug turf stretching from Larne 20 miles along the east Antrim coast to north Belfast, and pockets of Newtownards.

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