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Enniskillen bombing: ‘The police and civilians were using their bare hands to sift through the rubble for survivors’

In tribute to former Sunday Life editor Jim Flanagan who died last week we are publishing this extract from newly-released book, Reporting the Troubles 2, in which Jim recalled one of the worst days of the conflict.

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People fleeing the Enniskillen bomb seconds after the blast

People fleeing the Enniskillen bomb seconds after the blast

Soldiers carrying a wounded person from the scene

Soldiers carrying a wounded person from the scene

Marie Wilson's coffin passes the site of the explosion days after the attack

Marie Wilson's coffin passes the site of the explosion days after the attack

Jim Flanagan

Jim Flanagan

Ronnie Hill

Ronnie Hill

Princess Diana signs an autograph for a boy injured in the attack

Princess Diana signs an autograph for a boy injured in the attack

Princess Diana talks to Gordon Wilson, whose daughter Marie was killed

Princess Diana talks to Gordon Wilson, whose daughter Marie was killed

Headmaster Ronnie Hill, who was left in a coma after the attack, with wife Noreen

Headmaster Ronnie Hill, who was left in a coma after the attack, with wife Noreen

Bomb victim Marie Wilson

Bomb victim Marie Wilson

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People fleeing the Enniskillen bomb seconds after the blast

A telephone call to my home in Glengormley on the morning of Sunday, November 8, 1987, set in motion a chain of events that would remain seared into my mind forever.

The man on the telephone was esteemed Belfast Telegraph news editor Norman Jenkinson and, on this occasion, he had no time for small talk. A bomb had gone off near the cenotaph prior to the Remembrance Day service in Enniskillen. There were many casualties — men, women and children — and I was to get there as soon as possible.


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