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Greysteel killer's son threatened to kill burglary witnesses with potato peeler


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Richard Goodall, who is also known as Richard Mailey

Richard Goodall, who is also known as Richard Mailey

Richard Goodall, who is also known as Richard Mailey

The son of a "trick or treat" loyalist murderer has been jailed for 30 months for threats to kill witnesses to a burglary with a potato peeler.

Richard Goodall, who is also known as Richard Mailey, pleaded guilty to possession of an offensive weapon, two counts of threats to kill, burglary with intent to steal and handling stolen goods on April 20, 2019, at Newry Crown Court last week. Another burglary charge was left on the books.

The 25-year-old, whose dad Stephen Irwin was one of the killers involved in the Rising Sun bar massacre in Greysteel in 1993, had previously breached his bail conditions by fleeing his home at Belvoir estate in Belfast due to a perceived paramilitary "attack" on his life. He had told Sunday Life that dissident republicans were planning to kill him.

Newry court heard that Goodall's crime spree began when he entered a house in Ballymartin in the afternoon where he stole an iPad and Amazon Dot valued at £310 from a 13-year-old boy who was in his bedroom.

Later that night, a Kilkeel man returning home from work noticed a window of the next door house had been smashed and found traces of blood. Goodall was seen climbing in and was confronted by the man and another neighbour.

The thug threatened the pair, shouting "I've a f**king knife" as he brandished a pointed potato peeler from his pocket.

"I'm going to come back with a shotgun and blow your heads off," he also warned.

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Stephen Irwin

Stephen Irwin

Stephen Irwin

Police were called and during a search of Goodall's home in Kilkeel, officers found the stolen iPad.

He told police that he had taken "50 blues" suggesting diazepam and smelled of alcohol.

A defence barrister alluded to a pre-sentence report which showed that Goodall, who has 72 previous convictions, was suffering from alcohol and drug addiction as well as mental illness.

"He has clearly suffered more than most," said defence.

"There has been a high degree of physical and sexual trauma.

"From a young age he has had complex psychological issues. He has now been diagnosed as schizophrenic.

"The experience has been extremely disturbing to the injured parties. They were brave to challenge him.

"This was a schizophrenic episode, which was exacerbated by alcohol. He regrets his actions and now has a degree of victim insight.

"This was his first burglary. It is not his typical type of offending, he has now been assessed as not dangerous."

His Honour Judge Gordon Kerr said that Goodall will probably be moved to a psychiatric care ward while in custody.

"To say that he has had a troubled background would be an understatement.

"He has addiction issues with alcohol and drugs. He suffers from serious mental health issues and is schizophrenic in need of medical help," added the judge.

He will serve two years and six months with 50 per cent in custody and 50 per cent on licence.

A destruction order was also put in place for the potato peeler.

Two years ago Goodall, then using the surname Mailey, was seriously injured when he was shot in the New Lodge area of north Belfast.

In an interview with Sunday Life, he later claimed he had been told to leave the country by dissident republicans.

"They told me to leave the country but I'm not leaving; I think it's pure something to do with my dad, I do not know," said Goodall.

"I'm not leaving, it's just daft, whatever happens to me happens. If they're going to kill me they're going to kill me."

He added: "I wasn't even born when Greysteel happened."

Goodall said he has had no contact with his father, who was sentenced to life in prison for the UDA's 1993 Greysteel massacre at the Rising Sun Bar.

"I haven't spoken to him for about five years," he revealed.

Goodall's father Stephen Irwin (inset) was given eight life sentences for his part in the 1993 massacre at the Rising Sun Bar in Greysteel. One gunman shouted "trick or treat" before opening fire on a Halloween party, killing eight people - six Catholics and two Protestants - and wounding 19. The victims were aged between 19 and 81. Irwin was convicted alongside fellow loyalists Torrens Knight, Jeffrey Deeney and Brian McNeill for the massacre. He was given early release from prison in 2000 under the Good Friday Agreement but was back behind bars in 2005 after being convicted of knifing a football fan at the 2004 Irish Cup final.

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