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Stop protecting Lisa Dorrian's killer, UVF orders own man

Paramilitary Ultimatum

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Lisa Dorrian

Lisa Dorrian

Police officers at Ballyhalbert Caravan Park in Co Down where Lisa Dorrian was last seen in February 2005

Police officers at Ballyhalbert Caravan Park in Co Down where Lisa Dorrian was last seen in February 2005

PA

Lisa Dorrian's sister Joanne (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Lisa Dorrian's sister Joanne (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Mark Lovett

Mark Lovett

UVF boss Bunter Graham

UVF boss Bunter Graham

Lisa Dorrian

UVF bosses have ordered a Co Antrim commander to stop protecting Lisa Dorrian's murderer.

The matter was discussed during a meeting of the leadership of the terror gang last Monday, just 48 hours after the 15th anniversary of the Bangor woman's murder and secret burial.

Loyalist sources said the summit was prompted by Sunday Life's revelations last weekend about how the UVF has been protecting the killer.

For the past three years we have reported that he is being sheltered because he is the son of a Red Hand Commando (RHC) member who had a child with the sister of a UVF boss.

Despite the group knowing what he did to Lisa, he was given a job at a UVF taxi firm, which involved him taking vulnerable women home at night.

Embarrassed by this newspaper's revelations, the UVF leadership issued strict instructions to the commander to stop protecting this individual.

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Police officers at Ballyhalbert Caravan Park in Co Down where Lisa Dorrian was last seen in February 2005

Police officers at Ballyhalbert Caravan Park in Co Down where Lisa Dorrian was last seen in February 2005

PA

Police officers at Ballyhalbert Caravan Park in Co Down where Lisa Dorrian was last seen in February 2005

"It was the main topic of conversation at a UVF meeting last week," explained a loyalist source.

"It was made clear to the commander that Lisa Dorrian's killer should have absolutely no protection. The same message was also relayed to the Red Hand Commando.

"Bunter (UVF chief-of-staff John Graham) is furious that the UVF is being constantly linked to the case."

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UVF boss Bunter Graham

UVF boss Bunter Graham

UVF boss Bunter Graham

Graham was named in graffiti sprayed around Belfast last year urging him to force Lisa's killer to give up the location of her body.

For years he was kept in the dark about how the UVF commander and his RHC pal combined to stymie the police investigation. This is because of their family links to the murderer, the identity of whom is widely known.

Graham is also worried that the UVF's involvement will affect government funding going to projects it supports, including Alternatives NI, which raked in more than £1m last year.

The UVF source added: "Bunter is concerned that public money will be cut if the organisation doesn't distance itself from Lisa Dorrian's killer."

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Lisa Dorrian's sister Joanne (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Lisa Dorrian's sister Joanne (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Lisa Dorrian's sister Joanne (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Lisa's campaigning sister Joanne Dorrian is calling for the murderer, if convicted, to spend the rest of his life behind bars if he does not reveal the location of her body.

She appeared on BBC's Nolan Live last Wednesday to repeat the demand first made in Sunday Life last weekend.

Joining brave Joanne in the studio was Denise Murray, the twin sister of Charlotte Murray, who was murdered and then secretly buried by her ex-fiance Johnny Miller.

Last month he started a minimum 16-year jail sentence and has so far refused to tell Charlotte's grief-stricken relatives where he hid her body.

Both Joanne and Denise are campaigning for a 'Charlotte's law' that would see killers kept behind bars until their victim's remains were recovered.

"This law would mean life for any murderer who has hidden a body unless they disclose its location," said Joanne who, along with Denise Murray, is to meet Justice Minister Naomi Long to build her support for the proposal.

"This is an important move in our campaign because up until now we have focused on finding Lisa and treated justice as a secondary issue."

Lisa went missing after a drugs party in a Ballywalter caravan on the north Down coast in February 2005.

Detectives believe she may have been murdered between 10.30pm and 1.15am - a belief that is at odds with statements from Mark Lovett, the last man to see her alive.

Mark Lovett

He said they fled the caravan into the night at 4.45am after hearing noises and seeing flashing lights outside.

More than 400 land, air and sea searches have taken place since the murder, with the PSNI pursuing more than 3,500 lines of inquiry.

Detective Superintendent Jason Murphy, the cop leading the investigation, said: "There is nothing that suggests to me that Lisa was attacked by a stranger, that there were strangers on the site, or that she was taken off-site by anybody that didn't know her. That leads me to the conclusion that she was killed in the caravan."

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