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Carl Frampton

Deontay Wilder v Tyson Fury part II - we will not be short-changed

Carl Frampton


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Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder drew their first fight in December 2018 (Lionel Hahn/PA)

Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder drew their first fight in December 2018 (Lionel Hahn/PA)

PA Archive/PA Images

Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder drew their first fight in December 2018 (Lionel Hahn/PA)

In the early hours of next Sunday morning, we're going to find out who is the No.1 heavyweight on the planet. Tyson Fury's clash with WBC World champion Deontay Wilder is a fascinating battle.

Their first fight in November 2018 was an amazing spectacle, mainly down to the fact that Fury had come back after a year in which he lost 10 stone and had only boxed a couple of times having been away from the ring for nearly three years. How he managed to get up in the 12th round and then was also able to hurt Wilder is still hard to believe.

At the end I think everyone apart from the judges and Stevie Wonder thought Fury won that fight. Even though he was dropped twice, he won every other round. He is now in much better condition and that's why most people seem to believe that he will win the rematch but boxing is never that simple.

Wilder showed that he can hurt Fury, just like he can do damage to everyone else in the division because he's arguably the hardest-punching heavyweight in the history of the sport. But he will also have to employ a different tactic if he is going to win this fight.

If you watch the first fight, you will see that Fury constantly dipped down inside Wilder's right hand and that nullified the champion's attacks. Wilder has to use more feints, be more aggressive and a shot that can be very effective for him is a left hand coming up and turning into a hook as Fury looks to dip down. If I was his coach, I would have been drilling that shot into him 500 times a day.

I obviously don't know what they've been working on but if it's just the same as before, looking for the big right hand, then he will be outboxed because Fury is the one with the great ring intelligence.

Often it can take time to get used to a new coach but Fury doesn't have that luxury as he is going up against the most dangerous puncher in the world

There has been some talk that Fury could come in over a stone heavier but I'm not sure that would be a good idea because his movement and boxing is the key to winning this fight. I can't see how the extra weight will help because he can't go in and have a punch-out with Wilder as that would play into the American's hands.

It's going to be very interesting to see just what impact SugarHill Steward and Andy Lee have on Fury's performance because his former coach Ben Davison did a great job in bringing him back from the point where he was considering suicide to taking on and - in the eyes of the majority - beating Wilder.

Often it can take time to get used to a new coach but Fury doesn't have that luxury as he is going up against the most dangerous puncher in the world.

If Fury can dictate with his jab and use his ring craft to nullify Wilder's big shots then it's going to be a very frustrating night for the champion. Both men will have learned a lot from their first fight and whoever makes the right changes will come out on top. Then we all want to see the winner facing Anthony Joshua before the end of the year.

So, who will be champion and earn the status of No.1 heavyweight in the world?

Well, I know I should have a clear opinion but I feel like I'm getting splinters in my backside for sitting on the fence on this one - I'm just not fully confident in one clear prediction, except that it should be another dramatic night in Vegas.

Belfast Telegraph