| 18.4°C Belfast

Close

Premium

When women become killers: Some 46 years ago a mother-of-four was beaten to death by female UDA members in Belfast's Sandy Row

Eilis O'Hanlon explores how women can be just as deadly and brutal as men

Close

The body of murder victim Ann Ogilby lies in the grass beside the M1 motorway

The body of murder victim Ann Ogilby lies in the grass beside the M1 motorway

Ann Ogilby

Ann Ogilby

Elizabeth Douglas Snr who was jailed for 10 years in connection with Ann’s murder

Elizabeth Douglas Snr who was jailed for 10 years in connection with Ann’s murder

The disused building in Sandy Row where Ann was beaten to death

The disused building in Sandy Row where Ann was beaten to death

The disused building in Sandy Row where Ann was beaten to death

The disused building in Sandy Row where Ann was beaten to death

The body of murder victim Ann Ogilby lies in the grass beside the M1 motorway

Reading the accounts of those killed during the Troubles can be a distressing experience, not only because of the nature of the crimes which were committed on all sides during the conflict, but because of the number of victims who've been forgotten.

For their families, each death meant a lifetime of trauma. For everyone else, it was all too often a passing headline on the news, soon replaced in the mind as some abhorrent fresh atrocity took its place. It's important to keep remembering the names and faces of the people who died, and the unforgivable circumstances in which they lost their lives, if only to combat the efforts of those who tirelessly seek to whitewash the past.

A few days ago it was the 46th anniversary of the murder of Ann Ogilby, a 32-year-old single mother-of-four, who was beaten to death with bricks and sticks in a disused building in Sandy Row in July 1974, before her body was dumped near the M1.