Belfast Telegraph

Video: Gallipoli scrapbook unveiled by the Public Records Office brings to life the First World War battle 

A scrapbook of water-colour paintings created during one of the 20th century's greatest battles has been unveiled. In advance of the centenary of the First World War Gallipoli campaign, which began in April 1915, the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) has selected the book of sketches and photographs as document of the month. The scrapbook was compiled by a Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur O’Neill Cubitt Chichester who was serving in the Turkish Dardanelles during the First World War.

Video: Public Records Office unveil Gallipoli scrapbook of sketches and photographs from the First World War 

A scrapbook of water-colour paintings created during one of the 20th century's greatest battles has been unveiled. In advance of the centenary of the First World War Gallipoli campaign, which began in April 1915, the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) has selected the book of sketches and photographs as document of the month. The scrapbook was compiled by a Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur O’Neill Cubitt Chichester who was serving in the Turkish Dardanelles during the First World War.

Video: Father Browne's stunning photographs of Titanic go on display for first time 

The stunning work of a priest famed for his photographic images of RMS Titanic is to go on display in Northern Ireland for the first time. Frank Browne: Through The Lens is an exhibition of more than 100 photographs taken by the famous Titanic passenger Father Frank Browne - often described as the "father of photo journalism" - who was ordered off the liner by his superior at Cobh. The free exhibition, which opened yesterday, includes striking images taken by Fr Browne during his time serving as a chaplain in the First World War as well as a range of pictures from his world travels. Frank Browne: Through The Lens is free and on display at Titanic Belfast until March 31. Credit: Belfast Telegraph

Video: New collection of PRONI images merge Belfast's past and present 

A series of archival photos of Belfast, taken at the turn of the 20th century, have been merged with pictures of the same locations in the present day. Archival images of Belfast taken around the turn of the 20th century have been published by the Public Record Office, and merged with them are modern-day pictures of the city. They provide an interesting insight into life on our capital's streets in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Credit: Belfast Telegraph/PRONI

Video: Public Records Office photographs of 1930s ‘ghost woman’ at seance on display 

Photographs depicting ghostly faces taken at a séance in the 1930s have been released by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. The set of four photographs have been released especially for Halloween. They were found within the records of Lieutenant Colonel E. J. Gordon Tucker. Alan Robertson, PRONI, said: "These photographs show 'spiritualist manifestations' surrounding people who were involved in a séance." Credit: Belfast Telegraph

Video: New album of photographs shows life aboard Titanic to be almost Downton Abbey at sea 

Previously unpublished photographs of the launch of the Titanic have gone on display today at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra. The album includes an image of the famous vessel going down the slipway in the Belfast shipyard where it was constructed, with excited spectators chasing behind. William Blair, a human history expert, said: "The ship seems to be a perfect mirror reflection of society, you learn the class distinctions, the social codes of that era. It is almost Downton Abbey at sea." Credit: Belfast Telegraph

Video: Titanic - Unpublished photographs from 'remarkable album' go on public display at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum 

Previously unpublished photographs of the launch of the Titanic have gone on display in Northern Ireland. The album includes an image of the famous vessel going down the slipway in the Belfast shipyard where it was constructed, with excited spectators chasing behind. The prints were taken by a director at the Harland and Wolff yard in Belfast. The owner of the album purchased it at an auction two years ago and decided to put it on public display. Credit: Belfast Telegraph