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Woolly jumper: Spring lambs herald mostly bright and sunny Easter weekend

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Lambs enjoy the sun on the family farm in Larne

Lambs enjoy the sun on the family farm in Larne

Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph

Lambs enjoy the sun on the family farm in Larne

It is a scene that typifies the arrival of spring like no other: newborn lambs gamboling in the warm sunshine.

These cute young sheep were enjoying the outdoors on the McAuley farm in Larne, Co Antrim, as the lambing season got into full swing ahead of the Easter bank holiday weekend.

And while lockdown restrictions mean once again we find ourselves unable to mark the occasion as we would like, the weather forecast should bring some joy - at least in the short-term.

For Good Friday, another settled day is ahead. It is forecast to remain dry, accompanied by sunny spells, according to the Met Office.

Temperatures will feel quite warm, while winds will stay mostly light, although coastal areas will feel more chilly amid a maximum of 14C.

The outlook for tomorrow is also bright, with the day starting with sunny intervals and dry periods.

Easter Sunday, however, is likely to see some rain after a spell of clear skies in the morning.

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Animal magic: Ellie McAuley with a calf

Animal magic: Ellie McAuley with a calf

Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph

Animal magic: Ellie McAuley with a calf

The end of the bank holiday weekend will herald colder weather, with the Met Office forecasting bands of Arctic air moving across the UK from the north west by Sunday, bringing snow showers and freezing overnight temperatures.

"The snow showers will predominantly affect the north and west of the UK. The south and east will likely remain drier but still cold, with a lower chance of wintry showers," said meteorologist Mark Sidaway.

The outlook for Easter Monday here is some snow showers, with spells of hail, indicating the arrival of a brief cold snap.

The Met Office stressed it was not uncommon for spring to see big differences in temperature.

However, despite the low temperatures expected in the next week, it said the more notable weather was actually the recent warm spell, which saw the mercury reach 24.5C in some places in Britain this week.

On average, the UK experiences around 14 days each spring where temperatures fall to zero or below.

Chilly spring temperatures are not all bad news for gardeners, though.

Spring flowers like daffodils are accustomed to colder weather.

Belfast Telegraph


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